REVIEW: The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Society

I’m a sucker for war stories in general, but when I got emails from Netflix and Chapters talking about this book and it’s adaptation, I absolutely couldn’t say no.

The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society is written by an aunt and niece duo and follows author Juliet Ashton as she seeks out the subject of her next book. Upon receiving a letter from a gentleman in possession of a book she once gave away, Juliet forms firm friendships with the people who live on Guernsey Island while also developing a keen interest about their lives during the German Occupation that ended only the year before.

Told in letters and journal entries, the story is a pleasant one full of laughter and joy while also addressing the harsh realities of the trauma endured during the war and now post-war living. The intimacy of a novel told through personal letters really makes you care about every one of these people as they laugh and cry and get to know one another so deeply. It’s a story about people who love to read and how that love brings them together and keeps their hopes up even when there is seemingly no end in sight.

I adored this book from start to finish and know that I, for one, fell in love with Juliet myself. Although the ending felt a touch rushed, I found myself not caring because I came to love each and ever character like my real-life friends. Definitely the book to go to if you have been feeling down in the dumps as it is packed with laughs from cover to cover.

Everyone deserves their happy ending. I can’t wait to watch the film.


39832183Author: Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows
Published: December 12, 2011
Pages: 291
Publisher: Dial Press
ISBN: 9781984801814

Synopsis: January 1946: London is emerging from the shadow of the Second World War, and writer Juliet Ashton is looking for her next book subject. Who could imagine that she would find it in a letter from a man she’s never met, a native of the island of Guernsey, who has come across her name written inside a book by Charles Lamb. . . .

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