REVIEW: Pulp

Thank you NetGalley and Harlequin TEEN (now Inkyard Press) for providing me with the ARC.


Sometimes my impulse requests on NetGalley are interesting. I don’t always look at the author of the books I’m requesting but skip right now to the synopsis to see if a book appeals to me. This is one of those cases where not looking at the author both made me laugh and blew me away.

A few years ago, I read As I Descended by Robin Talley and I’m sorry to say I was beyond disappointed with that book. Because of how let down I felt, I gave up on Talley’s work instantly… until now.

Pulp tells the story of Abby Zimet as she falls in love with 50s lesbian pulp fiction author, Mirian Love, and is determined not only to track down the author but also write a novel of her own. Meanwhile, back in 1955, Janet Jones is also obsessed with lesbian pulp novels and also writing one of her own while also struggling to figure out her own sexuality in an era where that could get her and everyone she has ever cared about into dangerously deep trouble.

I was instantly in love with both characters and the way the story unfolds to reflect how similar and yet how different the lives of these two lesbian girls are over 60 years apart. Abby is such a realized character and so rounded as she struggles with her home life, her love life, and her school work in a whirlwind of emotional stress while Janet struggles with what too many people still struggle with today: acceptance for who she is.

But what really hit me the hardest was how real this story is. Robin Talley goes to great lengths to show that love is hard, love is cruel, but that doesn’t mean it’s not there. She shows how change can be good and that the end of something once held so dear doesn’t mean it was never there. Love is love both in the moment and after it which is so important for people to know. The importance of friendship and doing what makes you happiest are key even if that means letting people go.

This novel hit incredibly close to home in terms of how it tackles being forced to stay in the closet or letting people choose to ignore part of themselves because they believe it’s for the better. For lack of articulation’s sake: the heartbreak is real. I’ve had to let go of people in my life because they wanted to be “normal” and it was one of the hardest things I had to do. Even now it hurts and staying closeted in certain spaces hurts, but I did and do those things because it keeps me safe and it keeps those people safe, too.

I feel incredibly lucky having been able to read this novel and want to formally apologize to Robin Talley for disregarding her other works simply because one of her novels was not in my taste. I am sorry for that and truly hope that any queer person struggling is able to read this book and find a little bit of hope that things can still turn out okay in the end.

This book is available online and in stores November 13th, 2018.

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2 thoughts on “REVIEW: Pulp

  1. andywinder says:

    This review really got into the heart of the novel, and I agree with a lot of your points. This book was hard-hitting and painful to read, but so full of love at the same time. Out of curiosity, do you read a lot of queer YA and, if so, do you have any recommendations?

    Liked by 1 person

    • lucien welsh says:

      Thank you very much 🙂 As a queer person, myself, I try my best to keep up to date with as many queer releases as possible. Especially if the author is queer themselves.

      As for more queer YA recommendations my go-tos are History Is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera (who has queer romance plots in all of his books) and Aristotle & Dante Discover the Secrets to the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz. For something a bit more adventurous, The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee is also a lot of fun. Those are all m/m stories but I’m hoping to get into more lesbian or bi/pan/etc. stories in the future.

      Liked by 1 person

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