REVIEW: The Omen

I love scary movies, especially old ones. However, when it comes to The Omen, I’ve shamefully only seen the 2006 version with Julia Styles and Liev Schreiber (dir. John Moore)…

When browsing the small horror section at my favourite local used bookstore (Westside Stories, yes that is the real name of the store), I spotted this sweet movie-tie in edition of The Omen, but the 1976 tie-in! I couldn’t say no when I also found the second movie tie-in as well, so I picked them both up. Perfect timing on my part, as my internet was down for the majority of the weekend, giving me some distraction free time to sit down and get some real reading done. Given the slump I’ve been in lately, this was the perfect book to pull me out of it.

For those unfamiliar with the story, The Omen follows the lives of the Thorn family after a grief fuelled decision changes everything… for the worst. As their son, Damien, seems to draw disaster after disaster, death after death, to the family, Jeremy Thorn is faced with a dark choice of murder or mayhem before more people die.

As mentioned, I have only seen the remake of the film and never want to watch it again as the [spoiler alert] death of Kathy is one of the most horrifying things I have ever seen on screen. Despite my strong feelings towards it, the 2006 film is also one I consider strangely cast and more on the cheesy side. This original novel (and by original, I mean the novelization that was released prior to the 1976 film as a marketing shtick) is so much more. The atmosphere of The Omen is so thick and eerie, it drew me in immediately and did not hesitate to fill me with anxiety.

While there are significant differences (obviously) between the book and what I remember from the remake, I found myself absolutely loving the book. It was horrifying, fast paced, and brutal. When I first started reading, I felt the reveal of Damien’s birth came early, and I was worried for the sake of the pacing to come, but I was pleasantly surprised that there was still so much to learn about where the boy came from. The violence was graphic without going overboard and still more or less realistic when it comes to demonic horror. This is definitely a book where you want to yell at the characters for being stupid while also seeing that these characters aren’t stupid, they are conflicted people given a choice to tell a small lie to make their lives better overall. These characters are human. Even if that makes them flawed.

Given that this novelization is written by David Seltzer, himself – the screenwriter for the 1976 film – I do want to watch the film and actually get an eyeful of what he served on the page.

Bring on the Devil.

4 stars out of 5.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: