MANGA MONDAY: The Ways of the Househusband #1

Thank you to NetGalley and VIZ Media for providing me with a review copy.


Oono Kousuke’s series The Ways of the Househusband is one that I’ve been hearing a lot about, and considering I don’t actually read much straight-up comedy manga, I figured I would give it a go once I saw the first volume on NetGalley.

Oh my gods, this series is hysterical.

It follows Tatsu, an ex-yakuza boss (and a fierce one at that), who has given up his life as a killer to be a househusband with his career-focused wife, Miku. Now, despite Tatsu’s hardest attempts, he is still terrifying to most of the people he interacts with, his disposition unintentionally threatening and intimidating as he is still really only accustomed to talking about everything as if he was still in the yakuza.

There is a story arc of sorts in this volume, but each chapter is essentially a stand-alone short about the mishaps Tatsu gets himself into (my favourite of which is him fighting with the Roomba and the cat). It was a fast read and I can’t stress how hilarious this manga is. Tatsu is gorgeous and Miku is adorable, and I look forward to seeing how Tatsu’s old underling gets more involved in things.

I will definitely be picking up this series because I want more Tatsu in my life.

MANGA MONDAY: Boku no Hero Academia #1

Today is a special Manga Monday. Why? BECAUSE ALL-MIGHT IS HERE!

That’s right, today we’re talking about the first volume of Boku no Hero Academia – aka. My Hero Academia. I’ll say now that I started watching season one when it first came out so it’s force of habit to refer to this series as BNHA rather that MHA, but despite being familiar with the show (ps. I’m not caught up though) I’ve never actually read the manga so I was really excited to finally get to it.

Over the last few years, I’ve become so incredibly bored by superhero content. It used to be fun and different and now it’s just “white male rage” or a three hour trailer for the next three hour trailer in a long line of Disney over saturation. This is why it took my old roommate forcing me to watch BNHA with her to actually get me to watch it. And wow did I sob almost every episode because of Deku.

The first volume of the manga covers the first two or three episodes of the show (give or take) and the adaptation is pretty faithful. Midoriya Izuku is a powerless student in a world full of those with powers, yet he still wants nothing more than to be the kind of hero that saves people with a smile. After meeting his personal hero, All-Might, Izuku has that chance at last and he gets to learn what it means to have the responsibility of power.

I love the art style, I love the story, and I love almost 99% of the characters (true fans will know who is in that 1% category of hatred). The only thing that doesn’t super work in the English manga is “Deku”. The insulting nickname means “useless” or “someone who can’t do or achieve anything”, and is a cruel play on the kanji for Izuku. The explanation is there but yeah… not the easiest play on words to translate because English works so differently from Japanese. Regardless of that, the volume really draws back to Big 3 manga* in terms of an introductory volume and it honestly makes me happy. We don’t get these huge cast, long-running series any more and the part of me from high school that is still alive, is so nostalgic for it. BNHA isn’t trying to be something it’s not, but it’s nostalgic and heartwarming as well as full of intense action sequences.

It’s hard to separate the manga from the anime for this review, but I enjoy both and recommend both. This is a great series for fans new and old and is definitely a title to recommend for younger manga readers as well. It’s rated T, but so was Naruto and I will recommend that until the day I die.

Definitely 5 out of 5 for this one.


* Big 3 titles are the three most well known and popular titles in the genre and are Naruto, Bleach, and One Piece

MANGA MONDAY: The Promised Neverland #1

Thank you to NetGalley and VIZ Media for providing me with a review copy.


The Promised Neverland is one of those series that looks super cute but you can just tell that it is going to get really messed up, really quickly. I’ve got to say, I was not wrong with my prediction of this one.

The story mainly follows Emma and her friends, Norman and Ray, at their picture perfect little foster home where they and about thirty other children are being taken care of by a woman named Isabelle (but they all call her mom). The children do daily tests of intelligence and treat one another like they’re all family, and every two months one of the children is lucky enough to be adopted and gets to leave the house by way of the gate that the children are forbidden from getting close to. The only other rule is that they aren’t to cross the fence line in the forest that surrounds them. When one of the children being adopted, forgets her favourite plush rabbit, Emma and Norman learn the dark secret being kept from them…

While this first volume didn’t go too deeply into the horror that I’m sure is to come the further I read into the series, it definitely did a good job at setting up the tone of what’s to come next. I loved the heart in the story, though, and the way it captured the innocence and love shared between children while also keeping the advanced intelligence of Emma, Norman, and Ray still within believable range. The art work is very stylistic and cute, with all of the children having the most squishable little baby faces.

With the way this volume ended, I’m intrigued enough to keep going and giving a better judgement of the series off of subsequent volumes. But over all I thought this was a really great way to start a series like this, especially with the artwork being so cute only to get all murder-y. A solid four out of five.

MANGA MONDAY: Jujutsu Kaisen #2

To kick off March, I’m celebrating Manga Monday with the second volume of Akutami Gege’s debut series, Jujutsu Kaisen #2!

I mentioned in my review of volume 1, that I felt the series needed more time to build before I judged it entirely and I can already see growth between that volume and this one. The art is cleaner, the story full of more context and stakes. We even just to see who our “big bads” are going to be and I’m excited for that, especially since the one guy reminds me of a combination of Byakuya (from Bleach) and a touch of Giyu (from Kimetsu no Yaiba: Demon Slayer, but in looks only because I’ve yet to start that series so I can’t make an accurate character comparison). We’re meeting other students and even school rivals which is always fun and is fleshing out the world a lot more.

My only notes regarding this volume that kept it from being a 5-star read are minor. The first note is that I want more chemistry between the characters. Megumi and Yuji have a great chemistry, and same with Gojo and most of the students (but especially with Megumi and Yuji), but I want more. The three first years don’t interact well as a unit and it’s really stiff as opposed to the tension that existed between Team 7 in Naruto. I want more out of Kugisaki especially because she hasn’t given me a reason to like or care about her at all and I’m itching for a female character to like in this series. The other note I have is a little more nit-picky I think, and it’s that the series is only two volumes in at this point (in English volumes at least) and we’re already introducing a school festival of sorts? Even Naruto got four full volumes into the story before we got the huge cross-country exams in volume five. It just feels too early given that the characters are struggling with stiffness, but perhaps that’s just my opinion.

Regardless, I’m still really enjoying this series and look forward to when volume 3 comes out in April. Curse this every-other-month releases! I want more now!

MANGA MONDAY: Candy Colour Paradox #1

I know it’s been a solid week since I’ve posted a review, but I’m hoping to get back on track now that my health is more or less back to normal. I have fallen into something of a reading slump, but there will be more on that come Wednesday. For the time being, let’s get to this week’s manga read!

Today’s selection for Manga Monday is Natsume Isaku’s Candy Colour Paradox, a light-hearted yaoi series about a journalist and a photographer who are forced to work together despite being arch rivals at the magazine.

Considering all of the other yaoi series I’ve read this month, this one feels less thirsty – for lack of a better word – and more like a shoujo romance (despite the two leads being men). I don’t know how else to describe it but it almost feels like a slow burn considering how fast a lot of yaoi titles move. It also wasn’t as dirty or explicit as others I’ve been reading (which isn’t a bad thing) but I’m curious to see if that will change in future volumes.

I really liked the art style. It’s crisp and highly detailed which really adds interest to the story. I don’t want to keep comparing it to other titles, but I felt it had far more detail on all of the characters rather than primarily focusing on the two leads (something that got distracting sometimes in Classmates for sure). Not to mention Kabu and Onoe bicker like school children which gets really funny at times. I had a few issues with choices the translator made regarding speech patterns and slang but also understand why they were made. It was just off in some places and didn’t quite match what I believe Natsume was going for in the original Japanese.

Overall, I liked it enough to read the other three volumes I have, just maybe not right away. Because there is more detail and more plot, it took longer to read than the other series did but again, I liked that about this title. At this point I’d recommend it to anyone looking for a good entry read for yaoi manga. A solid 3 out of 5 stars for me.

MANGA MONDAY: Ten Count 1 – 3

Today’s #MangaMonday is coming a bit late due to a minor technical issue with my hydro, but better late than never!

Since I was horribly sick last week, I didn’t have much energy for reading, however I managed to catch up this weekend by reading the first three volumes of Takarai Rihito’s yaoi series, Ten Count. Takarai’s art is so gorgeous, that is what initially drew me to the series but I also can’t help but be intrigued when I find manga that’s shrinkwrapped.

Now, I should mention here that this is not a “boy love” manga. This is 100% NSFW and is rated for Mature Adults with explicit content. I won’t go into much detail about that aspect of the manga, but please understand that minors shouldn’t read this series.

Ten Count follows Shirotani, a corporate secretary, and Kurose, a mental health counsellor, as the two work together to help Shirotani with his OCD and symptomatic germaphobia. However, as the two see each other more and more, their professional relationship begins to turn into something more and neither of them is sure if that’s something they can handle – but for very different reasons.

I like the way the relationship starts in this series, and I do like how in the first volume Kurose isn’t pushy but rather very understanding. Volumes two and three got a little more… intense… I still really enjoyed the next two volumes, however, the explicit scenes felt actually pushy to me. For a yaoi manga, that’s nothing new but I guess I was expecting a slower burn for this series. Regardless of what I was expecting, Takarai is a wonderful artist and author and at the end of each volume she mentions how she is building a more Dom/Sub relationship between Shirotani and Kurose so I’m looking forward to seeing where that goes.

I give these first three volumes an average of 4 out of five stars. And with that dirty cliffhanger at the end of volume three, I’m definitely looking forward to picking up the rest of the series.

MANGA MONDAY: Classmates「complete series review」

This week a week of love, so let’s talk real romance!

For today’s Manga Monday I read the complete three-volume series, Classmates, by Nakamura Asumiko and really enjoyed them. The series follows Hikaru and Rihito’s relationship as it goes from friends to more. Hikaru first notices Rihito when his class is told they need to sing in a musical recital and takes it upon himself to tutor the shy boy. As the two start to grow closer – along with the graduation – things get more complicated and the two need to learn to think of each other as much as they think of themselves.

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Like come on, this art is perfection.

I loved the honesty in this series, the rawness and impulsivity of teenage boys. Hikaru and Rihito get mad over things that don’t make much sense and make up just as quickly as couples do when they’re sixteen. Even the art style, which is rough around the edges and raw in parts, really captures the exact tone of the story at every moment. It’s so hyper-stylized and it’s just stunning from cover to cover. Even the goofy little doodles between chapters that are mostly just Hikaru bothering Rihito are so cute, I fell in love with the two of them right away.

The only take away that I didn’t like was their teacher Hara-sen. He came off a bit overly pervy in my opinion, but the translated jokes where Hikaru called him “Hara-ssment” were so funny I died.

At only three volumes, Nakahara’s series is a good one to pick up and is really full of sweetness and light. Another good starting point for those looking for a good boy-love series.

REVIEW: Seven Days [Monday→Sunday]

To continue on my romance manga binge for the month of February, the series review of the week is Seven Days by Tachibana Venio and Takarai Rihito.

The edition published in English is a complete collection of the original two-volume series that follows upperclassman, Shino Yuzuru, and first-year, Seryo Toji, over their weeklong romance after Yuzuru asks Toji out on an impulsive whim. Toji is the school heartthrob who never has a girlfriend longer than a week, and Yuzuru is…well he’s an idiot in princely dress that the girls break up with once they get a look at his impulsive personality. Despite their flaws, the two boys seem perfect for each other but will they both come to the same conclusion once Sunday comes?

I really enjoyed this manga. It was a fast read and the art is absolutely stunning. Yuzuru made me laugh because of how dense he can be and Toji is a total babe. The story was paced wonderfully and I’m a sucker for a happy ending.

Reading this reminded me of how much I really enjoy fluffy boy-love manga and how comforting the nonchalance of the background characters is. So Yuzuru might be dating the most popular underclassman in the school? Cool beans. It’s just so nice to read these stories without a hint of homophobia or judgement and just bask in the cute, happy vibes.

Having read this while sick, it was a real pick-me-up and I would recommend to anyone looking for a softer yaoi manga to get into.

(LATE) MANGA MONDAY: No Longer Human

On Monday, I mentioned I was swapping things around and doing a regular book review so that I could share my review of the manga adaptation today.

The book in question is Dazai Osamu’s novel, No Longer Human, but adapted to the manga format by Japanese body horror king, Junji Ito.

Before I continue, this review contains trigger warnings for suicide, infanticide, violent imagery, and sexual assault.

So similarly to the novel (the review of which you can read here), this was a difficult one to get through. While I am very familiar with the content and the story of No Longer Human, Ito took this one to a whole other dimension. The story, itself, is heavily inspired by Dazai’s own life and there were certainly more elements of truth in the manga as well as far more fantastical horrors.

Unlike Ito’s other major works, his adaptation of No Longer Human was less focused on body horror and far more tuned into the psychological trauma that comes with the tortures Yozo faces. What was merely implied in the source material, was presented without apologies in the manga, and I’m not entirely sure if that’s a good thing or not. The sexual assault in the beginning and even throughout the story was intense and felt like it was too much given the format of the storytelling, however the ways Yozo is consistently taken advantage of is still so important to his story arc and the way his relationships (or lack thereof) are formed.

On top of that, there was far more death, far more suicide, and a lot heavier darkness. Dazai was not a happy man, and it can be seen throughout his short life by reading his novels and his stories. But the way that Ito really needles out the underlying sadness and turns it into something so solid and real it’s impossible to ignore as he beats you to death with it. Again, I’m conflicted by the emotions this manga drew from me because on the one hand it was a lot to process and manage, but on the other hand, it felt so real when it comes to how dangerous unchecked mental illness can be. It shows how important it is to really care for those who are suffering.

I loved the inclusions of Dazai himself as a character. I loved Ito’s artwork as I always do. But this was a rough one. Junji Ito is one of those mangakas who I rarely recommend because of how tricky it can be to navigate horror tolerance thresholds, but if you’re already familiar (and unbothered) with his work this is one to check out for sure.

 

MANGA MONDAY: Jujutsu Kaisen

A new series I want to do here is Manga Monday, a day dedicated to manga reviews to introduce new readers to some good series as well as keep up to date on titles for current readers. I’m hoping to talk about old and new series and look forward to spreading the love for manga of all kinds!

For this first Manga Monday, I decided to read a brand new title that was just released in English in December 2019. The series opening volume of Jujutsu Kaisen follows Itadori Yuji after the death of his grandfather as he and a mysterious student from Jujutsu High School seak out a cursed talisman before it can cause mass destruction. While trying to save his friends, Yuji takes an incredibly dangerous risk and becomes a vessel for the hyper-powerful being known as Sukuna, and ends up tangled in a bigger mess than he originally signed up for.

I really loved the key idea of this series focusing on fear and loss and how those negative and worrying emotions are typically the route causes of supernatural activity around Japan. The way the curses (depicted as slimy or hairy monsters) manifest was really neat as the different levels – both in terms of danger ranking and general intelligence – are determined by how the curse was originally formed. Volume 1 is definitely an introductory volume, but what I will say about it is that while I really appreciated that it wasn’t full of info-dumping, I would have loved a little more background about the Jujutsu Sorcerers and how the academy scouts their students or how the students even get their abilities in the first place.

That being said, for a debut manga, mangaka Akutami Gege’s style is wonderful. The character designs are reminiscent of early Kubo Tite (best known for Bleach) in a way that is both wonderfully nostalgic and yet still very new. I really am excited to see this series grow in both content and style and would recommend it to fans of BleachParasyte and maybe even Tokyo Ghoul.

I give this volume a solid 4.5 out of 5, with points only docked for my want of more background information on the characters and the rules of their powers, but I’m sure all will be revealed in the next volume or two.