RELEASE BLITZ: Machiavellian

Happy birthday, Mac!!

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Today is a big day for author Bella Di Corte, as she releases this incredible story to the world! Machiavellian is the first book in the Gangsters of New York trilogy and it is a book that will steal your heart with every chapter. Full of pain, love, and the importance of deep connections, Machiavellian is a story you won’t want to miss out on.

I was lucky enough to receive an advanced digital copy of this book so I could participate in the blog blitz for release day and I honestly didn’t think I would fall so deeply in love with it as I did. When it comes to romance novels, they are pure escapism for me and I grew up laughing at them before I started to appreciate the stories they were telling. My guilty pleasure, above all else, has always been mafia-based romance. I saw the word “mafia” and jumped right on being a part of this blitz, and wow am I so happy I did.

I’ve included a full description of the book at the bottom of this post, but the gist for this top-half review is this: Mariposa has been running away from pain her whole life, always just shy of absolute suffering on the rough streets of New York. Her trauma weighs heavily on her when it comes for asking for help, which means she doesn’t. But when things reach an absolute peak of unbearable, she ends up in the arms of Capo Machiavellio, a reclusive gazillionaire with more than intimidating connections to the dark underbelly of the city. As the two work circles around each other to get to the core of who they are and their connections to each other, there are other wolves on the prowl that threaten to take away all that they have and more.

When I first started reading this story, I went in with My Fair Lady vibes where a rich man takes a rag of a girl and makes her into something beautiful, but the story of Capo and Mari is so far from that. To break them down a little as people, Mari is the kind of take-no-shit woman who has been dealt hand after hand of shitty cards. She has fought for every last thing that she owns – even if she doesn’t own that much – and is determined to survive by the very skin of her fingernails. But despite all she has been through, Mari is not a cutthroat person. She is still kind herself, thinking of others before herself (to a fault in some cases), and still enjoying the little things in her life such as colouring her anxieties away in children’s colouring books. On the other side of the coin, we have Capo. Capo has literally been put through hell at the hands of his own family and it has made him hard, cruel, and vengeful. He is a rough man who had what he wanted torn from his hands and now he is demanding it back, no matter what it takes. However, Capo is not just a ruthless prick. There is warmth deep within him and he fights hard because he wants to protect those who have more warmth than he feels he is capable of himself. He walks a fine line in the jerk category, but is very good about not crossing it.

The way the relationship builds between Capo and Mari, and the way they tug each other back and forth, finding buttons that shouldn’t be pushed but pushing them anyway, is so wonderful. Written in dual first-person perspectives between the two of them lets us into their minds and allows us to see the reasons behind their actions, even the stupid actions. It’s a beautiful back and forth that stole my heart on several steamy occasions.

Ripe with intense mafia action that is edge-of-your-seat stressful, it’s funny that my favourite part of the book is a quiet moment. No spoilers, I promise. As Capo’s family in Italy slowly comes into the picture, we get to meet his grandfather. All of the moments with Nonno are so picturesque and in these current moments of unrest, made me cry. To make things personal for a moment, at this time I am unable to see my 98-year-old grandmother as visitors are not permitted in her retirement home (understandably so). The moments where Mari gets to talk with Nonno and connect with him, on top of the moments where Capo gets to be a little less hard with his grandfather… They both made me miss my grandmother so much while also reminded me to cherish every memory I have with her until I can see her again. In a book that gets pretty rough, pretty quick, the soft moments felt like home and I applaud Bella Di Corte for truly capturing these moments.

I could honestly go on and on and on forever about how I was touched by this book but then, I think, it would almost be shorter to read the book itself. I was honestly not expecting to love this book as much as I do and I’ve been dying to post this review for over a week now. The violence is just as real as the love and if you love mafia stories but are looking for something new and fresh, I implore you to buy this book. Let Capo steal your heart just as much as Mari does. And then send me an email so I can have more people to yell about it with, haha!

I know that Mac is only just on shelves today, but I’m already itching for book two. Let’s hear it for Gangsters of New York!


Machiavellian_Ebook_Amazon

 

 

Title: Machiavellian (Gangsters of New York, Book 1)
Author: Bella Di Corte
Genre: Mafia Romance
Release Date: May 8, 2020
Hosted by:
Buoni Amici Press, LLC.

Add on GoodReads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/51802347-machiavellian
Buy on Amazon:
https://amzn.to/2xZQHvd

Book Description:

Machiavellian is the first of three books set in the savage world of the Gangsters of New York series. 

I hungered to be seen.
There were three things I knew about Capo Macchiavello:
He was gorgeous.
He was reclusive.
He was considered one of New York’s most savage animals.
And he wanted me as his wife. A simple arrangement – you do for me, I do for you. Nothing owed, no expectations. Except for one: never leave.

 Life was never that simple, though. By the age of twenty-one, I was parentless, jobless, and homeless, and I had come to learn the hard way that nothing was ever free. Even kindness comes with strings.

Capo might’ve been the only man to ever see me, but I had made a vow to myself: I would never owe anyone anything. Most of all, the man I called boss.

 I killed to stay hidden.

Mariposa Flores thought she owed nothing to no one, but she owed everything…to me, the ghost the world had once called The Machiavellian Prince of New York. 

About the Author: 

Bella Di Corte has been writing romance for seven years, even longer if you count the stories in her head that were never written down, but she didn’t realize how much she enjoyed writing alphas until recently. Tough guys who walk the line between irredeemable and savable, and the strong women who force them to feel, inspire her to keep putting words to the page.

Apart from writing, Bella loves to spend time with her husband, daughter, and family. She also loves to read, listen to music, cook meals that were passed down to her, and take photographs. She mostly takes pictures of her family (when they let her) and her three crazy dogs.  

Bella grew up in New Orleans, a place she considers a creative playground.

She loves to connect with readers, so don’t hesitate to email her at belladicorte@gmail.com if you’d like to reach out. 

You can also find her:

At Home: http://belladicorte.com
On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BellaDiCorteAuthor
On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/belladicorte
VIP Access: https://www.facebook.com/groups/BellaDiCortesRoseRoom

Follow:
On Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2UsKj89
On Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/belladicorte/
On Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B085949YN9
On Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/belladicorte
On BookBub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/bella-di-corte

REVIEW: Megabat does a Zoom launch party

Thank you to Penguin Random House Canada, Tundra Books, and NetGalley for providing both an eARC and a finished copy of this book.


To say things have been rough over the last few weeks is to put it mildly, but one thing that truly cheered me up was receiving a package from the wonderful staff at Penguin and Tundra that contained the third book in my favourite middle-grade series, Megabat! At almost 26-years-old, I am definitely not the target audience, but as the one person in my family that people come to for book recs for readers of all ages, I do enjoy digging into junior readers every now and again, and Megabat is incredible. (You can read my reviews of the first two books in the series here)

In Megabat Is A Fraidybat, Megabat and Daniel learn to conquer their fears as they head off to sleepaway camp. Daniel, who has only ever heard of how horrible sleepaway camp is, is far from excited about going. Megabat, on the other hand, is thrilled at the idea of an adventure and new friends. Once they reach camp, Daniel slowly begins to loosen up as he meets new friends in his cabin and learns that his fears weren’t based on how camp actually is. But after a councillor tells a ghost story, Megabat isn’t feeling so confident anymore…

As usual, I loved this little book from top to bottom. The illustrations are as adorable as ever, and the story tackles fear in a very relatable way for children reading the book to understand. I can see it being a good book to explain sleepaway camp to children who may be afraid of going for the first time, or even just using it to talk about fear in general. Sometimes the things that scare us aren’t always as bad as we think they are. All I know is that if I could find an Ewok bobble-head that looked like Kass Reich’s illustration, I would have a hoarding problem with them, haha!

Now, this installment of the Megabat series was released April 7th, and for obvious reasons, that meant a different kind of launch party. Held over Zoom, Anna Humphrey and Kass Reich talked with the Junior Library Guild about all things Megabat and it was delightful. I will say, it wasn’t the smoothest discussion, but what can you really say when the majority of the meeting is attended by children under the age of 10 who are bored with their parents’ laptops, phones, or tablets? If nothing else, it was funny towards the beginning of the discussion to see little faces popping up to wave hello to Anna and Kass.

Anna opened the meeting with a reading of the new book, followed by a detailed drawing tutorial by Kass, both of which were fun. Following that, a Q&A began that was moderated by a member of the Junior Library Guild (whose name I, unfortunately, didn’t catch). Questions focused mostly on fun little things, like a game of “Would You Rather” and what missaid word of Megabat’s is your favourite, but a few of them went most into publishing.

When asked more about how to go about the illustrations, Kass said that she gets the manuscript and has ideas for what moments should be illustrated, but that it is mostly up to the editor, Samantha Swenson, on picking out the scenes. She went on to say that it’s important to be aware of the spacing of illustrations in a book like this, since the book shouldn’t be overcrowded by pictures nor should there be inconsistent gaps between them. The best question Anna got was about the inspiration for Megabat. She mentioned that after a big move, she and her family were feeling particularly homesick and one night, she discovered an out of place leak on the main floor of her three-story home. Anna continued, saying that she let her fiction-writer brain run and came up with the theory that the leak was a sad fruitbat, crying over his own homesickness.

All in all, a fun way to spend a lunch hour, and a wonderful book for readers of all ages. All three Megabat books are available everywhere, and book four is set for a Spring 2021 release!

 

DNF Review: Infinity Son

So my first fresh read of 2020 (meaning I didn’t start it in 2019) was meant to be Infinity Son by Adam Silvera. I’m a big fan of Adam’s contemporary work, so when he said he was releasing a fantasy novel I was so excited! However, I’m sad to say that this was not what I was hoping for at all and it’s also become my first DNF of the year.

Over the last several months I kept seeing tweets referring to it as an “epic fantasy novel” which I took to mean high fantasy (think Lord of the Rings) when it turns out the use of the word “epic” was meant to be used as a word for “cool” and in reference to the book rather than the genre. Part of this is my own fault for not looking more closely at the back of the ARC, but I’ve got to say I was disappointed at the “urban” level of the genre.

On a good day, I’m not a fan of urban fantasy. It takes a lot for me to be interested in a fantasy novel that is set in the real world, so that was already a mark against this novel. Strike two was that not only was it urban fantasy, it was a superhero story; yet another subgenre element that I’m not interested in. Had I known that’s what this book was going to be I wouldn’t have requested the ARC in the first place.

To me, the biggest problems were in the first two chapters. And by problems, I mean the entire plot of the book is so easily guessable. In this world, it seems that people have until their 18th birthdays to discover if they have superpowers or not. It is also mentioned that there are “villain” characters who do something with phoenix blood to force superpowers on themselves. Now, this is a decent enough concept (with more PG-rated Vicious vibes) but quickly becomes boring when you consider that the main characters are twin boys, one of which just wants to be a normal boy and the other who wants to be a hero. I didn’t even make it past 13 or so pages but I can basically guess that Normal Boy Twin gets powers on their birthday while Other Twin goes after phoenix blood to become a hero.

I’m so sad that this book is miles away from what I was hoping for, but as a result, I will be hosting a giveaway on my Instagram for this ARC. I’d really love if it went to a good home with a reader who would actually enjoy a book like this.


Giveaway post
(Giveaway open to North American residents only, see post for details)

REVIEW: The Widow of Pale Harbour

Thank you to Harper Collins Canada and Graydon House for providing me with a copy of the ARC.


Attention all Poe fans! Do I have a book for you!

The Widow of Pale Harbour is the second standalone novel from Hester Fox and follows Gabriel Stone – a man on the run from his past posing as a priest – and Sophronia Carver – a wealthy woman accused of murder and witchcraft – as they navigate their way through the puzzles left by a madman terrorizing Pale Harbour by way of Edgar Allan Poe’s twisted works.

I really enjoyed this topsy turvy mystery novel. I wasn’t sure what to expect from Hester Fox’s latest novel, but it was definitely a lot of fun. The mystery itself was well thought out and even with the limited cast of characters, I still had a hard time cracking the case before the end of the book. It was the right balance between an armchair mystery and a horror-inspired thriller, with the mystery itself being on the gruesome side while very clearly knowing where the line was in terms of the descriptions.

The romance plot wasn’t exactly a slow-burn, but it moved at a good speed as the characters unfolded on the pages. We really get to know Gabriel and his dedication to those he cares for as well as Sophronia and her fear of being hurt (emotionally and physically) by those she thinks she cares for.

This is definitely a great book for the upcoming Halloween season and is a good cozy read for a chilly autumn day. If you’re an older reader who enjoyed the Stalking Jack the Ripper series by Kerri Maniscalco, this would be a title I would certainly recommend.

 

 

The Ghost Collector Blog Tour

Allison Mills’s debut novel, The Ghost Collector, is a middle-grade contemporary novel with a hint of the paranormal. Shelly’s family can catch ghosts in their hair and help them find their way to the afterlife when ready. Using this talent as something of a job, Shelly’s grandmother often takes her ghost hunting as they free the ghosts of animals from homes the owners are convinced are the spirits of horrible people. When Shelly’s mom passes away, the girl needs to come to terms with what real loss feels like and how holding on to what’s meant to be let go of can be more destructive than you may think.

The Ghost Collector is meant for younger audiences but also doesn’t hold back in hitting hard with the feels. It’s a powerful novel for anyone struggling to deal with a loss and I know that it helped give me a bit more perspective on a recent loss in my life. I definitely thank Allison for that.

I really liked Shelly and her relationship with her family. Her grandmother reminded me of mine in so many ways which warmed my heart. Not to mention that I could understand the idea of struggling to make “real friends” like Shelly did. Growing up I considered fictional characters I read about to be more real friends than my classmates or any other kids I met, so her having a hard time connecting with her classmates was incredibly relatable.

Change is so difficult, and change because of loss is even harder. This novel captured all of that so wonderfully. While sad, it was satisfying.

With all of that being said, I was lucky enough to have the chance to ask author Allison Mills herself some questions about this exciting release.


Lucien: First off, congratulations on the release of The Ghost Collector! I’ve seen in another interview you’ve given as well as in the acknowledgements of the advanced copy of the book, that this novel was the result of expanding on a short story (If a Bird Can Be a Ghost) you’ve previously written. What was it about the story that made you want to expand upon it?

AllisonThank you! I’m really happy the release date is finally here. It feels like it’s been a long time in the making, especially if you take the short story that became The Ghost Collector as the starting point. The characters and world of If A Bird Can Be A Ghost—the short story that The Ghost Collector is based on—stuck with me after I finished the story. I kept going back and trying to do something else with them. I have two or three abandoned short stories set within the same world or using some of the same characters. I knew I wanted to expand on the story somehow, and then Claire Caldwell, my editor at Annick Press, approached me about the possibility of turning the story into a novel and it was kind of like the stars aligned. I was really fortunate to get a chance to play in this space again.

How did the experience of writing the novel differ from when you were working with it as a short?

The biggest difference is that I wrote them with different audiences in mind. The short story, although it’s still about Shelly, was written for adults. In writing the novel, I spent a lot of time thinking about how to frame discussions of death and grief for a younger audience—and especially for younger Indigenous readers. As a kid, I read a lot of fantasy books that, when they had an Indigenous character in them, treated them as an archetype more than a person, and it was always really alienating for me. I didn’t want The Ghost Collector to feel like it played into stereotypes. I wanted to write a paranormal story about an Indigenous family that grounded the characters in the modern world, that framed Indigenous peoples as present. I know from experience that it’s easy for non-Indigenous people to historicize us and to romanticize some mystical version of us and our cultures. With that in mind, I tried to be deliberate about the way I wrote the ghosts in the book and to have the characters push back against stereotypes other characters try to apply to them.

Writing a novel was also a chance to spend more time with the characters. Scenes with Joseph and Shelly talking to each other were my favourite thing to write when I was working on the short story, and I got to add a lot more of that when I expanded the story into a novel. Getting to add more scenes with Shelly’s mother was also great. She didn’t get much screen time in the short story, but I wrote it knowing exactly who she was and what her relationship with Shelly was like, so putting more of it down on the page was honestly kind of cathartic.

There are several instances of music being important in describing who the characters are. Where The Cure and Siouxsie and the Banshees are important to Joseph, what band would you say best fits you?

This is a really hard question. I think it changes week to week, but right now, I’d say I’m alternating between Hozier and Carly Rae Jepsen as musical artists that fit me best.

Does music often play a role of its own in your writing?

It definitely does! I like writing with background noise. I’ll make playlists for certain moods I want to hit in my writing or music that I think is really emblematic of a certain character or story or moment—Joseph and his connection to post-punk/goth is a good example of that. Having music in the background helps me focus on what I’m doing, although it also means that sometimes a song becomes a symbol of a story or characters and is no longer something I can listen to for the sake of listening to it.

Throughout the book, Shelly collects ghosts of several kinds, from people to animals. If you could keep a ghost of someone (or something) would you? If so, what ghost would you keep?

I’m going to be honest, I spent a lot of my childhood really obsessed with ghost stories, but also terrified of ghosts conceptually. Even if my book didn’t focus on the importance of not letting your ghosts linger, I don’t think I’d want to keep one around. That said, there is part of me that definitely sees the appeal of a ghost pet. Cheap, with no clean up required, but you still get the companionship offered by a living pet and you never have to worry about them getting sick! It’s kind of the ideal.

The Ghost Collector is a story of learning to let go and live life the way it is meant to be lived. But it is also a story of grief, especially the grief of a young girl. Were you every concerned about the content being too much for the younger readers who may be drawn to it?

That was definitely a concern I had while I was writing. Some things changed between the short story and the novel because of the shift in audience. I talked about some of that in relation to Indigenous readers already, but more generally one of the things I tried to do when I wrote the book was balance the darkness of Shelly’s grief with moments of lightness, either through humour or by having other characters reach out to Shelly—adding in something to alleviate the tension in the book so that the grief never gets too heavy for the reader to carry.

That being said, grief is a very important emotion to learn about and even learn from when we face it. Is there a reason why you wanted to tackle that lesson by using a ghost story as the basis?

I’ve always had an affinity for ghosts and ghost stories. When I was writing the short story The Ghost Collector is based on, I liked the concept of someone who can see and interact with the dead suddenly not being able to find the one ghost they want to interact with. It seemed like an interesting way to show someone grappling with the realities of loss and grief.

You’ve said that your Ililiw/Cree and settler Canadian heritage has played a part in your love of ghosts and ghost stories, are you able to elaborate on that?

Yeah! It’s kind of a two-fold thing. Part of it is that when I think about ghosts I think about them as manifestations of the liminal—they’re not alive, but they’re not quite gone either. They occupy this boundary space that I really like exploring and am fascinated by. I’m Indigenous, but because I have settler Canadian family too, I’m white-passing and have a lot of white privilege. I spend a lot of time grappling with the complex—at least to me—reality of that so I think part of me liking ghosts so much is that I feel like I exist in a liminal space too.

Less tied to my multiple identities and thoughts about the ways I interact with the world, I also just grew up hearing stories about my great-grandmother Louisa finding bodies for the RCMP in Chapleau, where our band is from and where my grandfather grew up. And, you know, there were plenty of other stories told about her too—like, Louisa really liked the Mary Poppins movie and would watch it whenever she visited when my mom was a kid—but that’s not as sensational as an uncanny knack for discovering missing persons, so it didn’t implant itself in my brain the same way stories about the RCMP coming knocking on the door did.

If there was one thing you hope reader’s take away from The Ghost Collector, what do you hope it is?

The importance of our connections to other people. I think allowing yourself to be known by others—making yourself vulnerable by expressing your feelings instead of bottling everything up inside—can be an incredibly difficult thing to do, but our relationships with one another are what get us through our darkest moments. I really hope that’s something readers of The Ghost Collector will be left with.


I would like to thank Annick Press and Allison Mills for allowing me to be a part of this blog tour and for providing me with a copy of the ARC.

The Ghost Collector is set to be available everywhere on September 10th, 2019.

Who is G.O.?

today i sneezed
so hard
i shook my brain
inside my head.

ever thought about your brain before?
try it.
now your brain             is thinking
about   itself


I received a rather mysterious post card from the wonderful team at Tundra Books. But what could it mean?

I think it means an even bigger mystery is on it’s way to my mailbox and I’m definitely looking forward to it.

Stay tuned!


The Collected Works of Gretchen Oyster by Cary Fagan, coming fall 2019.

 

REVIEW: A Megabat Double Feature

Thank you to Penguin Canada and Tundra Books for providing me with copies of these books


MEGABAT

Megabat is a book about friendship in unlikely places and the importance of helping those you care about wrapped up in a funny premise full of amazing illustrations.

_MG_6519Daniel Misumi has just moved away from his friends in Toronto into a strange old house where his bedroom is not only leaking but is in the attic. Miserable and lonely, Daniel discovers that what he believes to be a ghost is actually a talking! Learning the bat has be mistakenly taken from his home, Daniel does his best to help Megabat get reunited with his family with the help of another new friend across the street.

This first book is wonderful. It’s funny, fun, and full of goofy Star Wars references to make any level of geek happy. Given the young age demographic and reading level this is meant for, I enjoyed the light-heartedness of the story and the lower-end stakes. There are also plenty of vocabulary words that would make great practice for young readers as well as several “topics” that could be used for just-for-fun research and learning (such as the different kinds of bats or general geography).

The illustrations are absolutely wonderful in this book and not only help break up the chapters but add an extra layer of humour to the story. Especially when the Star Wars references come in or Megabat is doing something silly with his tongue. While black and white, they still feel vibrant and Kass Reich’s style definitely adds to the quaint feeling of Anna Humphrey’s narrative.

Non-violent and full of life, I really had a good time with this despite being a 24-year-old book blogger. It certainly would have been a good book to have when I used to babysit.

MEGABAT MEETS FANCY CAT

The second Megabat book focuses this time on mistakes and misunderstandings as well as second-child syndrome. It’s also told from Megabat’s perspective rather than Daniel’s providing a different level of goofy humour.

_MG_6518It’s Christmas, and Daniel has been surprised with a new cat! Priscilla has been adopted from an old lady who has developed allergies, and she is very fancy. Megabat and Priscilla don’t exactly get off on the right foot, causing more than bit of mayhem in the Misumi household.

Much like the first one, this book was a bucket of fun. Having Megabat’s thoughts be the main narrative was so cute and entertaining especially with the “language barrier” Megabat deals with. However, this one seems to have more of a message in it, and despite all of the confusion and meanness, Megabat learns to apologize for his mistakes. Not to mention that Daniel explains to Megabat how a family getting larger doesn’t mean the amount of love shares get smaller, even if that new addition is getting a lot of attention. As someone who is an older sibling, it’s definitely a relevant topic to discuss with kids even if they’re only children since it can happen even in friend groups, not just in families.

Another solid hit from author Anna Humphrey and illustrator Kass Reich. I certainly look forward to more Megabat in the future.


Both Megabat and Megabat Meets Fancy Cat are available now wherever books are sold!

The Matchmaker’s List Blog Tour!

dityjorvqaa1mmcSonya Lalli’s debut novel, The Matchmaker’s List, follows Raina as she struggles with the pressures of her family and her culture in regards to getting married. Her best friend is set to be married on Raina’s 30th birthday and with her ex-boyfriend still looming in her mind, Raina is having a hard time handling the stress of her crazy busy investment job on top of all the blind dates her grandmother is setting her up with. I was lucky enough to have a chance to ask Sonya a few questions regarding her amazing book!


Lucien: Congratulations on the North American release of The Matchmaker’s List! Have there been many new experiences between the UK release of The Arrangement back in 2017 and now releasing over here?

 Sonya: Thank you so much! Both experiences have been incredible and I’m so thankful to the wonderful people who have made it happen, and the writing and book bloggers community who have been so supportive. The big difference has been that my book is now being released in my home country. Walking into a bookstore and seeing my book on the shelf for the first time was priceless — it was at the WH Smith in Liverpool Street Station, by the way! — but it’s going to be absolutely overwhelming when I go home to Saskatoon and see it on shelves there.

You have such a strong writing voice. Was pursuing writing always a goal of yours?

 That’s really nice of you to say. And I think so, even though it wavered in terms of priority. During law school for example, I don’t think I wrote at all. I actually don’t think I even read anything that wasn’t a textbook.

What drew you to writing romance?

I don’t think I intended to write in a certain genre. Before, I didn’t even think about genre when I wrote. But in retrospect the fact that I ended up here makes perfect sense. I am a complete sucker for romance.

What’s harder, law school or writing a novel?

Writing a novel. One hundred percent. Yes, law school was hard but everything was concrete. You had the text books, the classes, the exams — you knew what you needed to study and when the tests would be scheduled for and what the passing mark was. Writing a novel… everything is up in the air. There is no set path or right or wrong. You just have to go for it, stick at it, and hope for the best.

From Canada to the States to England and back again, which was your favourite city to live in?

Hmmm. I absolutely loved London, but part of the reason I loved it so much was that I knew being there was temporary. So I think my answer is Toronto. It’s diverse and buzzing and vibrant, and it also is where I see myself spending the rest of my life. Saskatoon will always be home to me, but now Toronto is too.

In the novel I loved the comparison of “modern arranged marriage” to online dating and dating apps. When did that idea come to you in terms of explaining how things work?

While I was writing the book. Some of my friends use dating apps where you can be matched with people who are similar to you, and I thought: well, that’s just like if one of their auntie’s set them up with a guy they thought was similar.

You tackle the social issue of coming out to an unwelcoming community. What drew you to that plot line? Have you ever witnessed something so polarizing in your own social/family circle?

A good thing about my culture is the importance of family, but that also means that our choices in that respect — relationships, marriage, children — can be heavily scrutinized. It can be difficult for the older generations especially to come to terms with choices that don’t meet their family values. As the book shows, these values are changing and modernizing, but the process is slow and every family and community is different.

There have been instances in my community where somebody does something ‘different’ for the first time — and it draws attention, sometimes negative attention– but then eventually it stops being a big deal. Often, no one bats an eyelid the next time that same thing happens.

You also get into the sexism issues of more tradition Indian culture. Do you think that sexism is an issue that is getting better or worse?

I think it depends on the family and community. In my experience, yes, it has gotten a lot better. (A tiny example: thirty-five years ago when my mom didn’t give up her maiden name, people talked; when I didn’t change my name after my wedding, nobody cared.) But I can’t speak for everyone. I know that in general we still have a long way to go.

I loved Raina’s friendship with Shay, even when they were fighting. You’ve said that Nani was inspired by your own grandmother. Was Shay drawn from any real-life friendships?

Shay is a composite of a few of the strong, funny, amazing women in my life: my cousin, who is like a sister to me, and a few of my closest friends.

At its core, The Matchmaker’s List seems to be about finding your place in the world. Whether that’s fitting in with expectations or demolishing them entirely. What kind of advice would you give someone struggling with finding themselves?

Thank you. Even though this is a romance, you’re right, it’s also about Raina’s journey to becoming who she is, and respecting herself enough to be in the ‘right’ romance. I can’t remember who said this — it’s probably been said in a number of iterations — but we first need to love and know our true selves before we can allow another person to love us. That’s easier said than done. So I guess I would say don’t be too hard on yourself. Don’t try and stick to some timeline.  Believe in yourself and your choices, and you’ll come out the other end stronger.

I’ve got to ask, what’s next for you?

I have another book coming out with Berkley in 2020. It’s not a sequel, but another standalone rom com. I hope there will be more after that. I will continue to work in publishing by day, and write by night!

Thank you, Sonya, for taking the time for the interview. I’m sure I’m not the only one looking forward to your future work and wish you all the best!


And now it’s time for the review!

What I loved about this book was that it wasn’t what I was expecting. I went in looking for a girl going on dates as she’s told to do and finding the perfect guy. Very Hallmark. Cute and simple.

What I got was a story about not just finding love with someone else, but with yourself and your community. It’s about breaking down expectations within Raina and her community as she struggles with her life, as Shay fights against a traditional marriage rituals, as others within their community struggle against homophobic views.

Raina’s character really grows across the year the novel takes place and it was a touching story. Inner strength is powerful, and a lot of us are far stronger than we believe. That’s the reminder The Matchmaker’s List brings to us. Definitely worth picking up under either of it’s publication titles!


I would like to thank Penguin Random House Canada, Berkley Publishing, and Sonya Lalli, herself, for providing me with a copy of this book and for talking the time to allow this blog tour post to happen. 

REVIEW: Strange Days

Thank you Penguin Random House Canada and G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers for providing me with a finished copy of the book to review.


I live by a strong motto when it comes to the books that I read and that is “Life’s too short for books you don’t like”. However, considering I received this debut novel in exchange for a review, I felt the need to push through and really give it a change to redeem itself.

Strange Days is a debut novel by Constantine Singer that follows Alex Mata as he fights to save the world from an alien invasion after being blamed for the murder of his parents (who were killed by said aliens).

When I first heard of this book it made me think Ready Player Go with a little bit of District 9 and a touch of Enders Game. I was expecting action packed scenes of a group of teens time traveling and saving people. Sadly, what I got was…nothing.

While the narrative voice is strong, I had a hard time relating to Alex or even any of the other characters. While the cast is wonderfully diverse, I had a problem with the way the one gay character was portrayed. To get into specifics, Paul is tubby, speaks in a feminine stereotype, and the subplot of his life comes across as more homophobic as Alex is 100% uncomfortable with it and then doesn’t understand why Paul gets upset.

The biggest issue for me, though, is that it doesn’t really go anywhere. Alex witnesses the same person’s future (rather than actual time travel) and we don’t really learn any new information from it. By the time I finished the book I was just waiting for it to get to the point which is unfortunate.

At the end, it really just feels like a book for 15-year-old boys who don’t read. And that’s not always a bad thing. Everyone should have a book for them and let’s be real this is a quick read despite being 400 pages long. I’m just not someone I think this book was directed towards. I do hope Constantine Singer keeps writing because, as I said, his narrative voice is strong. His plotting just needs to be a bit stronger.

REVIEW: The Perfect Girlfriend

Thank you to the publishers for providing Indigo Books & Music Inc. with an ARC for review as part of the selection process for the January Staff Pick of the Month.

This review does not reflect the views and opinions of Indigo Books & Music Inc. and are my own independent thoughts of the work being reviews.


I love a good domestic thriller, and am always open to supporting a debut author, so I was more than happy to pick up the ARC when I saw it on the break room desk a few months ago back when I was working for Indigo Books.

The Perfect Girlfriend by Karen Hamilton is a domestic thriller following Lily – or Juliette, as she goes by now – as she seeks to get her ex-boyfriend back in a process that gave me a similar feeling to Single White Female. Starting with joining the airline Nate works for as a flight attendant, Lily seeks to convince him how deeply, madly in love with her he definitely must be and get her perfect life back on track.

There are a few other bits that are all tied up in her mission, including wanting to be more successful than a mean girl from her childhood (who happens to be Nate’s sister) as well as still dealing with the death of her younger brother and now her estranged mother. While these added aspects added something akin to depth to the story, they also felt more loose in terms of plot planning and weak justification for Lily’s behaviour.

You have probably guessed that I was not overly fond of this title, and you would be correct. While the writing itself was strong, it felt like a story I already read. As I mentioned above, Single White Female was only one of the films that popped into my head while reading, along with Fatal Attraction and Gone Girl (in terms of the open ending). I usually don’t mind “borrowed” ideas as influence is always going to be in our media, but it just didn’t work with this one.

The novel is told from Lily’s perspective which gave me a hard time since I had a hard time connecting with her. At one point in my life, I was also a badly bullied little girl, but the extremes that Lily went through to not only get revenge but also to justify her behaviour to herself. It wouldn’t be a domestic revenge thriller without murder and even that part had me more rolling my eyes and wondering why no one suspected how out of her mind this woman is. It all seemed just far too over the top for me.

As always, perhaps this book just wasn’t for me. If you like the films/books I’ve referenced in terms of “borrowed” influences, then you might enjoy this book. I hope Karen Hamilton keeps writing and I enjoyed her style enough to give her next book a chance. 2 out of 5 stars from me.


This book is available now at any Indigo, Chapters, or Coles location and has an official release of December 31st, 2018.